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Surg Today. 2013 Oct;43(10):1140-4. doi: 10.1007/s00595-012-0397-0. Epub 2012 Nov 7.

Polypropylene mesh repair of incarcerated and strangulated hernias: a prospective clinical study.

Author information

  • 1Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, 58140, Turkey, otopcu@cumhuriyet.edu.tr.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

There is a common doubt regarding the application of polypropylene mesh to treat incarcerated and strangulated hernias due to the possibility of surgical site infection. We aimed to investigate the results of mesh repair of incarcerated and strangulated hernias, and to evaluate the incidence of wound infection and recurrence.

METHODS:

One hundred and fifty-three consecutive patients with incarcerated and strangulated hernias underwent surgery with mesh repair. The patients were divided into two groups: a resection group and a nonresection group. Fisher's exact test, the Chi-square test and independent samples t test were used to determine the statistical significance level (p < 0.05).

RESULTS:

While 53 patients required organ resection, the remaining 100 patients did not. The most frequently incarcerated organs were the omentum (86), small bowel (74) and colon (15). Most of the resections were performed in the omentum (36), small bowel (23) and colon (2). While five of the 53 patients (9.4%) in the resection group developed wound infections, no infections were observed in the nonresection group (p = 0.004). The infection rate in all patients was 3.3% (five of 153 patients). None of the infected patients required mesh removal. There were no mortalities or recurrence in either group.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings revealed effective and safe usage of mesh along with antibiotic therapy in patients undergoing incarcerated and strangulated hernia repair.

PMID:
23132323
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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