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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 Jan;22(1):167-74. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-12-0781. Epub 2012 Nov 1.

An analysis of the association between cancer-related information seeking and adherence to breast cancer surveillance procedures.

Author information

  • 1University of Pennsylvania, 3620 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. atan@asc.upenn.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Breast cancer surveillance is important for women with a known history of breast cancer. However, relatively little is known about the prevalence and determinants of adherence to surveillance procedures, including associations with seeking of cancer-related information from medical and nonmedical sources.

METHODS:

We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of breast cancer patients diagnosed in Pennsylvania in 2005. Our main analyses included 352 women who were eligible for surveillance and participated in both baseline (~1 year after cancer diagnosis) and follow-up surveys. Outcomes were self-reported doctor visits and physical examination, mammography, and breast self-examination (BSE) at 1-year follow-up.

RESULTS:

Most women underwent two or more physical examinations according to recommended guidelines (85%). For mammography, 56% of women were adherent (one mammogram in a year) while 39% reported possible overuse (two or more mammograms). Approximately 60% of respondents reported regular BSE (≥ 5 times in a year). Controlling for potential confounders, higher levels of cancer-related information seeking from nonmedical sources at baseline was associated with regular BSE (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.01-2.29; P, 0.046). There was no significant association between information-seeking behaviors from medical or nonmedical sources and surveillance with physical examination or mammography.

CONCLUSIONS:

Seeking cancer-related information from nonmedical sources is associated with regular BSE, a surveillance behavior that is not consistently recommended by professional organizations.

IMPACT:

Findings from this study will inform clinicians on the contribution of active information seeking toward breast cancer survivors' adherence to different surveillance behaviors.

PMID:
23118144
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3538899
Free PMC Article
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