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Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v71i0.19002. Epub 2012 Oct 26.

Teaching wilderness first aid in a remote First Nations community: the story of the Sachigo Lake Wilderness Emergency Response Education Initiative.

Author information

  • 1Institute of Health Policy & Management, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To understand how community members of a remote First Nations community respond to an emergency first aid education programme.

STUDY DESIGN:

A qualitative study involving focus groups and participant observation as part of a community-based participatory research project, which involved the development and implementation of a wilderness first aid course in collaboration with the community.

METHODS:

Twenty community members participated in the course and agreed to be part of the research focus groups. Three community research partners validated and reviewed the data collected from this process. These data were coded and analysed using open coding.

RESULTS:

Community members responded to the course in ways related to their past experiences with injury and first aid, both as individuals and as members of the community. Feelings of confidence and self-efficacy related access to care and treatment of injury surfaced during the course. Findings also highlighted how the context of the remote First Nations community influenced the delivery and development of course materials.

CONCLUSIONS:

Developing and delivering a first aid course in a remote community requires sensitivity towards the response of participants to the course, as well as the context in which it is being delivered. Employing collaborative approaches to teaching first aid can aim to address these unique needs. Though delivery of a first response training programme in a small remote community will probably not impact the morbidity and mortality associated with injury, it has the potential to impact community self-efficacy and confidence when responding to an emergency situation.

KEYWORDS:

Aboriginal health; access to trauma care; community-based participatory research; first response; qualitative research

PMID:
23110258
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3482695
Free PMC Article
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