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Genet Med. 2013 Apr;15(4):299-306. doi: 10.1038/gim.2012.135. Epub 2012 Oct 25.

Can a decision aid enable informed decisions in neonatal nursery recruitment for a fragile X newborn screening study?

Author information

  • 1Social, Statistical, and Environmental Sciences, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA. dbailey@rti.org

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine whether a brochure based on principles of informed decision making improved attention to study materials or altered decisions made by parents invited to participate in a fragile X syndrome newborn screening study.

METHODS:

A total of 1,323 families were invited to participate in a newborn screening study to identify infants with fragile X syndrome as well as premutation carrier infants. Of these families, 716 received the original project brochure and 607 were given a new decision aid brochure.

RESULTS:

Families were more likely to look at the new decision aid and mothers were more likely to read it completely, but the proportion of mothers who read the entire decision aid was only 14%. Families were more likely to rate the decision aid as very helpful. Consistent with informed decision making theory and research, participants receiving the decision aid brochure were less likely to agree to participate.

CONCLUSION:

The decision aid increased attention to and perceived helpfulness of educational information about the study, but most families did not read it completely. The study suggests that even well-designed study materials are not fully reviewed in the context of in-hospital postpartum study recruitment and may need to be accompanied by a research recruiter to obtain informed consent.

PMID:
23100013
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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