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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Dec;207(6):506.e1-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2012.09.030. Epub 2012 Oct 3.

Antenatal identification of major depressive disorder: a cohort study.

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  • 1Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lucile S. Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, Stanford, CA, USA. dlyell@stanford.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of identification of major depressive disorder by providers during prenatal care.

STUDY DESIGN:

A cohort of pregnant women who were participating in a randomized controlled trial and who had received a diagnosis of major depressive disorder was examined. Women were included in the current study if prenatal clinic records were available and legible.

RESULTS:

Clinical depression was noted in 56% of prenatal charts and on 24% of problem lists. Physicians and certified nurse midwives noted depression equally (P = .935); physicians more frequently noted mental health referral (23% vs 0%; P = .01), and midwives more frequently included depression on the problem list (P = .01). Recent medication use, which was stopped before conception or study participation, predicted notation of depression in the chart (P = .001).

CONCLUSION:

Depression frequently is missed during pregnancy and, when identified, is underacknowledged as a problem. Women who have not recently used antidepressant medication are more likely to be missed. Better screening and acknowledgment are needed.

Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23099192
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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