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J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2013 Jan;145(1):150-7; discussion 157-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2012.09.053. Epub 2012 Oct 23.

Contemporary patterns of surgery and outcomes for aortic coarctation: an analysis of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

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  • 1Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Brenner Children's Hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Health, Winston Salem, NC, USA. rungerle@wakehealth.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to describe characteristics and early outcomes across a large multicenter cohort undergoing coarctation or hypoplastic aortic arch repair.

METHODS:

Patients undergoing coarctation or hypoplastic aortic arch repair (2006-2010) as their first cardiovascular operation in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database were included. Group 1 patients consisted of those with coarctation or hypoplastic aortic arch without ventricular septal defect (coarctation or hypoplastic aortic arch, isolated); group 2, coarctation or hypoplastic aortic arch with ventricular septal defect (coarctation or hypoplastic aortic arch, ventricular septal defect); and group 3, coarctation or hypoplastic aortic arch with other major cardiac diagnoses (coarctation or hypoplastic aortic arch, other).

RESULTS:

The cohort included 5025 patients (95 centers): group 1, 2705 (54%); group 2, 840 (17%); and group 3, 1480 (29%). Group 1 underwent coarctation or hypoplastic aortic arch repair at an older age than groups 2 and 3 (groups 1, 2, and 3, 75%, 99%, and 88% <1 year old, respectively; P < .0001). The most common operative techniques for coarctation or hypoplastic aortic arch repair (group 1) were end-to-end (33%) or extended end-to-end (56%) anastomosis. Overall mortality was 2.4%, and was 1%, 2.5%, and 4.8% for groups 1, 2, and 3 respectively (P < .0001). Ventricular septal defect management strategies for group 2 patients included ventricular septal defect closure (n = 211, 25%), pulmonary artery band (n = 89, 11%), or no intervention (n = 540, 64%) without significant difference in mortality (4%, 1%, 2%; P = .15). Postoperative complications occurred in 36% of patients overall and were more common in groups 2 and 3. There were no occurrences of spinal cord injury (0/973).

CONCLUSIONS:

In the current era, primary coarctation or hypoplastic aortic arch repair is performed predominantly in neonates and infants. Overall mortality is low, although those with concomitant defects are at risk for higher morbidity and mortality. The risk of spinal cord injury is lower than previously reported.

Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

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