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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2012 Nov;98(2):257-63. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2012.09.013. Epub 2012 Oct 16.

Acute blood glucose fluctuations can decrease blood glutathione and adiponectin levels in patients with type 2 diabetes.

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  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Glutathione appears to have apparent antioxidant activity to counter regulate hyperglycemia induced oxidative stress. Adiponectin also plays a role in the suppression of the metabolic derangements in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The aim of this study was to determine whether blood glucose fluctuations can alter blood levels of glutathione and adiponectin.

METHODS:

We enrolled 34 patients with type 2 DM. As a measure of short-term glycemic variability, the mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) was computed from a continuous glucose monitor system (CGMS), and data were recorded over 72 h. For long-term glycemic variability, we calculated the standard deviation (SD) of HbA1c over a 2-year period. Glutathione and adiponectin levels were measured after completing the 72-h CGMS data collection.

RESULTS:

The blood levels of glutathione were significantly and negatively correlated with MAGE (r = -0.543; P < 0.001), but not with HbA1c and SD of HbA1c. Adiponectin levels were also significantly and negatively correlated with MAGE and SD of HbA1c (r = -0.64 and r = -0.55, respectively; P < 0.001). Using generalized estimating equations, multivariate regression analysis revealed that MAGE is an independent predictor of serum levels of adiponectin (P = 0.002) and glutathione (P = 0.004).

CONCLUSIONS:

We found strong associations between acute blood glucose variability, glutathione, and adiponectin in type 2 diabetic patients treated with oral hypoglycemic agent therapy.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23084042
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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