Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e46033. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0046033. Epub 2012 Sep 25.

In-depth analysis of patient-clinician cell phone communication during the WelTel Kenya1 antiretroviral adherence trial.

Author information

  • 1University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. miavanderkop@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The WelTel Kenya1 trial demonstrated that text message support improved adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and suppression of HIV-1 RNA load. The intervention involved sending weekly messages to patients inquiring how they were doing; participants were required to respond either that they were well or that there was a problem.

OBJECTIVES:

1) Describe problems participants identified through mobile phone support and reasons why participants did not respond to the messages; 2) investigate factors associated with indicating a problem and not responding; and 3) examine participant perceptions of the intervention.

DESIGN:

Secondary analysis of WelTel Kenya1 trial data.

METHODS:

Reasons participants indicated a problem or did not respond were extracted from the study log. Negative binomial regression was used to determine participant characteristics associated with indicating a problem and non-response. Data from follow-up questionnaires were used to describe participant perceptions of the intervention.

RESULTS:

Between 2007 and 2009, 271 participants generated 11,873 responses; 377 of which indicated a problem. Health issues were the primary reason for problem responses (72%). Rural residence (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.96; 95%CI 1.19-3.25; p=0.009 and age were associated with indicating a problem (adjusted IRR 0.63 per increase in age group category; 95%CI 0.50-0.80; p<0.001). Higher educational level was associated with a decreased rate of non-response (adjusted IRR 0.81; 95%CI 0.69-0.94; p=0.005). Of participants interviewed, 62% (n=129) stated there were no barriers to the intervention; cell phone issues were the most common barrier. Benefits included reminding patients to take medication and promoting a feeling that "someone cares".

CONCLUSIONS:

The WelTel intervention enabled frequent communication between clinicians and patients during the WelTel Kenya1 trial. Many patients valued the service for the support it provided, with health-related concerns comprising the majority of problems identified by participants. Few sociodemographic characteristics were associated with participant engagement in the intervention.

PMID:
23049928
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3457960
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk