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PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e45144. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0045144. Epub 2012 Sep 26.

Association between CD14 gene C-260T polymorphism and inflammatory bowel disease: a meta-analysis.

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  • 1Department of Gastroenterology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The gene encoding CD14 has been proposed as an IBD-susceptibility gene with its polymorphism C-260T being widely evaluated, yet with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between this polymorphism and IBD by conducting a meta-analysis.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Seventeen articles met the inclusion criteria, which included a total of 18 case-control studies, including 1900 ulcerative colitis (UC) cases, 2535 Crohn's disease (CD) cases, and 4004 controls. Data were analyzed using STATA software. Overall, association between C-260T polymorphism and increased UC risk was significant in allelic comparison (odds ratio [OR]  =1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.43; P=0.027), homozygote model (OR  =1.44, 95% CI: 1.03-2.01; P=0.033), as well as dominant model (OR  =1.36, 95% CI: 1.06-1.75; P=0.016). However, there was negative association between this polymorphism and CD risk across all genetic models. Subgroup analyses by ethnicity suggested the risk-conferring profiles of -260T allele and -260 TT genotype with UC in Asians, but not in Caucasians. There was a low probability of publication bias.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

Expanding previous results of individual studies, our findings demonstrated that CD14 gene C-260T polymorphism might be a promising candidate marker in susceptibility to UC, especially in Asians.

PMID:
23049772
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3458839
Free PMC Article
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