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Behav Ther. 2012 Dec;43(4):768-78. doi: 10.1016/j.beth.2012.04.001. Epub 2012 Apr 11.

The role of anxiety sensitivity and mindful attention in anxiety and worry about bodily sensations among adults living with HIV/AIDS.

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  • 1Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. agonzalez14@partners.org

Abstract

The current study examined cognitive factors that may be relevant to understanding anxiety and worry about bodily sensations among an HIV/AIDS population. Specifically, this investigation tested the main and interactive effects of anxiety sensitivity and mindful attention on anxious arousal, bodily vigilance, interoceptive fear, and HIV symptom distress among 164 adults with HIV/AIDS. Results indicated that anxiety sensitivity was positively related to anxious arousal, bodily vigilance, and interoceptive fear, but not HIV symptom distress. Mindful attention was negatively related to anxious arousal, interoceptive fear, and HIV symptom distress, but not bodily vigilance. These main effects for anxiety sensitivity and mindful attention were evident after controlling for disease stage, years with HIV, and demographic variables. There were no interactive effects between anxiety sensitivity and mindful attention. Results are discussed in terms of the clinical implications for identifying and treating anxiety and worry about bodily sensations among adults with HIV/AIDS. Limitations of this study include the use of cross-sectional data and self-report assessments.

Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

PMID:
23046779
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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