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J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013 Mar;67(3):257-64. doi: 10.1136/jech-2012-201540. Epub 2012 Oct 6.

Effects of a free school breakfast programme on children's attendance, academic achievement and short-term hunger: results from a stepped-wedge, cluster randomised controlled trial.

Author information

  • 1Clinical Trials Research Unit, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. c.nimhurchu@nihi.auckland.ac.nz

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Free school breakfast programmes (SBPs) exist in a number of high-income countries, but their effects on educational outcomes have rarely been evaluated in randomised controlled trials.

METHODS:

A 1-year stepped-wedge, cluster randomised controlled trial was undertaken in 14 New Zealand schools in low socioeconomic resource areas. Participants were 424 children, mean age 9±2 years, 53% female. The intervention was a free daily SBP. The primary outcome was children's school attendance. Secondary outcomes were academic achievement, self-reported grades, sense of belonging at school, behaviour, short-term hunger, breakfast habits and food security.

RESULTS:

There was no statistically significant effect of the breakfast programme on children's school attendance. The odds of children achieving an attendance rate <95% was 0.76 (95% CI 0.56 to 1.02) during the intervention phase and 0.93 (95% CI 0.67 to 1.31) during the control phase, giving an OR of 0.81 (95% CI 0.59 to 1.11), p=0.19. There was a significant decrease in children's self-reported short-term hunger during the intervention phase compared with the control phase, demonstrated by an increase of 8.6 units on the Freddy satiety scale (95% CI 3.4 to 13.7, p=0.001). There were no effects of the intervention on any other outcome.

CONCLUSIONS:

A free SBP did not have a significant effect on children's school attendance or academic achievement but had significant positive effects on children's short-term satiety ratings. More frequent programme attendance may be required to influence school attendance and academic achievement.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR)-ACTRN12609000854235.

PMID:
23043203
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3582067
Free PMC Article
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