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J Biol Chem. 2012 Nov 16;287(47):39824-33. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M112.393504. Epub 2012 Oct 4.

Poly(ADP-ribose) contributes to an association between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A in nucleotide excision repair.

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  • 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA.

Abstract

Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) promotes the formation of UVR-induced, DNA helix distorting photolesions such as (6-4) pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Effective repair of such lesions by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway is required to prevent DNA mutations and chromosome aberrations. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a zinc finger protein with well documented involvement in base excision repair. PARP-1 is activated in response to DNA damage and catalyzes the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) subunits that assist in the assembly of DNA repair proteins at sites of damage. In this study, we present evidence for PARP-1 contributions to NER, extending the knowledge of PARP-1 function in DNA repair beyond the established role in base excision repair. Silencing the PARP-1 protein or inhibiting PARP activity leads to retention of UVR-induced photolesions. PARP activation following UVR exposure promotes association between PARP-1 and XPA, a central protein in NER. Administration of PARP inhibitors confirms that poly(ADP-ribose) facilitates PARP-1 association with XPA in whole cell extracts, in isolated chromatin complexes, and in vitro. Furthermore, inhibition of PARP activity decreases UVR-stimulated XPA chromatin association, illustrating that these relationships occur in a meaningful context for NER. These results provide a mechanistic link for PARP activity in the repair of UVR-induced photoproducts.

PMID:
23038248
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3501068
Free PMC Article
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