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Neuropharmacology. 2013 Feb;65:29-38. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2012.09.008. Epub 2012 Sep 25.

Metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptor antagonists improve behavioral and prefrontal dopaminergic alterations in the chronic corticosterone-induced depression model in mice.

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  • 1Laboratory of Medicinal Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

Abstract

Metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptor antagonists have an antidepressant-like effect, but the exact mechanism still remains unclear. This study examined the effects of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists in chronic corticosterone-treated mice which could be used as an animal model of depression. In the forced swim test, the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists MGS0039 (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and LY341495 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p) significantly reduced the increased immobility time of mice pretreated with corticosterone (20 mg/kg, s.c.) for 21 days, while desipramine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and fluoxetine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. The antidepressant-like effect of LY341495 was not blocked by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Systemic administration of LY341495 did not affect basal release of glutamate, dopamine or serotonin in the prefrontal cortex of the control or chronic corticosterone-treated mice. Chronic corticosterone markedly enhanced high K(+)-induced release of dopamine, but not serotonin or glutamate, in the prefrontal cortex. This neurochemical change was blocked by systemic administration of MGS0039 and LY341495, but not desipramine or fluoxetine. These results suggest that chronic corticosterone-treated mice could be used as an animal model of treatment-resistant depression. This study also suggests that the prefrontal dopaminergic system is involved in the antidepressant-like effect of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists in the chronic corticosterone-induced depression model.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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