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Phys Ther Sport. 2013 May;14(2):98-104. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2012.03.013. Epub 2012 Sep 21.

Comparison of active stretching technique in males with normal and limited hamstring flexibility.

Author information

  • 1Research Group: Musculoskeletal System, Physiotherapy and Sports. University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. Franciscoayalarodriguez@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

(1) to analyse the accumulative effects of a 12-week active stretching program on hip flexion passive range of motion (HF-PROM), and (2) to compare whether participants with different PROM baseline scores (normal and limited hamstring flexibility) respond in the same way to stretching.

DESIGN:

Repeated measures design.

SETTING:

Controlled laboratory environment.

PARTICIPANTS:

138 males were categorized according to hamstring flexibility in the unilateral passive straight-leg raise test (PSLR) and assigned to one of two groups: normal hamstring flexibility (≥80°) or limited hamstring flexibility (<80°). In each group, participants were randomly distributed into one of two treatment subgroups: (a) control or (b) active stretching. The active stretching subgroups performed 12 weeks of flexibility training, the control subgroups did not stretch.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

HF-PROM was determined through the PSLR test.

RESULTS:

Both stretching subgroups significantly improved (p < 0.01) their HF-PROM from baseline. The control subgroups did not.

CONCLUSIONS:

12 weeks of an active stretching program performed 3 days per week with a daily stretch dose of 180 s improved HF-PROM in both populations (normal and limited hamstring flexibility). The stretching program was equally effective in terms of absolute improvement values for males with normal and limited hamstring flexibility.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23007137
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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