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Ann Gen Psychiatry. 2012 Sep 24;11(1):24. doi: 10.1186/1744-859X-11-24.

No association between dietary patterns and depressive symptoms among a community-dwelling population in Japan.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Japan. nsuga3@yahoo.co.jp.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies of the associations between diet and depression have primarily focused on single nutrients or foods. Recently, dietary patterns representing a combination of foods have attracted more interest than individual nutrient. The objective of this study was to examine the association between dietary patterns and depressive symptoms among a community-dwelling population in Japan.

METHODS:

We examined the association between dietary patterns and the risk of depression among 791 Japanese community-dwelling individuals. Diet was assessed with a validated brief-type self-administered diet history questionnaire (BDHQ). Dietary patterns from 52 predefined food groups [energy-adjusted food (g/d)] were extracted by principal component analysis. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) with a cut-off point of 16 was used to assess the prevalence of depression.

RESULTS:

A total of 97 subjects (12.3%) were classified as having depression. Four dietary patterns were identified: "Healthy", "Western", "Bread and confectionery", and "Alcohol and accompanying" dietary patterns. After adjusting for potential confounders, the dietary patterns were not related to the risk of depression.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study failed to find associations between dietary patterns and the risk of depression. However, the interpretation of our results was hampered by the lack of certain data, including employment physical activity and longitudinal observations. Potential associations between dietary patterns and depressive symptoms were not completely ruled out. Future research exploring dietary patterns and depressive symptoms is warranted.

PMID:
23006931
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3532227
Free PMC Article
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