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J Infect Dis. 2012 Nov;206(9):1350-8. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jis517. Epub 2012 Sep 21.

Increase in rates of hospitalization due to laboratory-confirmed influenza among children and adults during the 2009-10 influenza pandemic.

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  • 1Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Emerging Infections Programs (EIP) network has conducted population-based surveillance for hospitalizations due to laboratory-confirmed influenza among children since 2003, with the network expanding in 2005 to include adults.

METHODS:

From 15 April 2009 through 30 April 2010, the EIP conducted surveillance among 22.1 million people residing in 10 states. Incidence rates per 100 000 population were calculated using US Census Bureau data. Mean historic rates were calculated on the basis of previously published and unpublished EIP data.

RESULTS:

During the 2009 pandemic of influenza A virus subtype H1N1 infection, rates of hospitalizations due to laboratory-confirmed influenza were 202, 88, 49, 31, 27, 36, 28, and 27 episodes per 100 000 among persons aged <6 months, 6-23 months, 2-4 years, 5-17 years, 18-49 years, 50-64 years, 65-74 years, and ≥75 years, respectively. Comparative mean rates from previous influenza seasons during which EIP conducted surveillance were 153, 53, 20, 6, 4, 8, 20, and 56 episodes per 100 000 among persons aged <6 months, 6-23 months, 2-4 years, 5-17 years, 18-49 years, 50-64 years, 65-74 years, and ≥75 years, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

During the pandemic, rates of hospitalization due to laboratory-confirmed influenza among individuals aged 5-17 years and 18-49 years increased 5-fold and 6-fold, respectively, compared with mean rates from previous influenza seasons. Hospitalization rates for other pediatric and adult age groups increased, compared with mean rates from previous influenza seasons, whereas the rate among individuals aged ≥75 years decreased.

PMID:
23002448
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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