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Pediatr Obes. 2013 Feb;8(1):e19-23. doi: 10.1111/j.2047-6310.2012.00098.x. Epub 2012 Sep 19.

Increased Toll-like receptor (TLR) mRNA expression in monocytes is a feature of metabolic syndrome in adolescents.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA. olga.gupta@utsouthwestern.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) is diagnosed frequently in some but not all overweight adolescents. Chronic inflammation, as seen in obesity, is strongly associated with MetSyn.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this pilot study was to assess the correlation between activation of the innate immune system and MetSyn, independent of body mass index (BMI), in a young population.

METHODS:

We quantitatively measured both systemic pro-inflammatory cytokines and gene expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and downstream cytokines in circulating monocytes obtained from nine adolescents with metabolic syndrome (Overwt-MetSyn) and eight BMI-matched controls (Overwt-Healthy).

RESULTS:

The Overwt-MetSyn group demonstrated a significant elevation in expression of TLR2, TLR4, tumour necrosis factor-a (TNF a) and interleukin-6 (IL6) in peripheral monocytes, and increased circulating levels of TNF a and IL6 when compared with the Overwt-Healthy group. TLR2 (r = 0.78, P < 0.001), TLR4 (r = 0.57, P < 0.01) and TNF a (r = 0.61, P < 0.01) gene expression positively correlated with serum levels of TNF a.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study suggests that activation of the innate immune pathway via TLRs may be partially responsible for the increased systemic inflammation seen in adolescents with MetSyn.

© 2012 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

PMID:
22991262
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3546604
Free PMC Article

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