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Ann Plast Surg. 2012 Oct;69(4):380-2. doi: 10.1097/SAP.0b013e31824b3d6b.

Outcomes of delayed abdominal-based autologous reconstruction versus latissimus dorsi flap plus implant reconstruction in previously irradiated patients.

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  • 1Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10065, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Local recurrence after breast conservation therapy is usually managed with salvage mastectomy. Multiple methods of reconstruction are possible, although delayed autologous reconstruction provides the most reliable results.

METHODS:

We compared complications in delayed abdominal-based [transverse rectus abdominis muscle (TRAM)/deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP)] reconstruction with delayed latissimus dorsi plus implant-based reconstruction in previously irradiated breasts. The authors reviewed 133 consecutive cases of delayed breast reconstructions performed in patients who had postmastectomy radiation therapy and reconstruction with abdominal-based methods (single-pedicle TRAM, supercharged pedicle TRAM, muscle-sparing TRAM free flap, DIEP flap, and superficial inferior epigastric artery flap) or a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap plus implant. Complications for donor and recipient sites were recorded including infection, seroma, hematoma, and partial flap loss.

RESULTS:

Seventy-five patients were reconstructed with abdominal-based flaps (37 muscle-sparing TRAMs, 19 pedicled TRAMs, 12 DIEPs, 6 supercharged pedicled TRAMs, and 1 superficial inferior epigastric artery). Their median age was 50 years and mean follow-up was 22.7 months. Three (4.0%) patients required reoperation during the same hospital visit for vascular compromise that resulted in 2 (2.7%) flap failures. Three (4.0%) patients had partial flap loss that ultimately required debridement and primary closure. Seventeen (22.7%) patients had minor complications including seroma, small hematoma, cellulitis, and abdominal bulge. Fifty-six patients were reconstructed with latissimus dorsi flaps plus implants. Their median age was 47 years and mean follow-up was 32 months. Three (5.4%) patients developed infections resulting in implant loss. Four (7.1%) patients had partial flap loss that required debridement and primary closure. Thirteen (23.2%) patients had minor complications including seroma (12 patients) and hematoma (1 patient) that required drainage. Fisher exact test was used to determine statistical significance of complication and failure rates between the 2 types of reconstruction. In patients who had postmastectomy radiation therapy, those with abdominal-based reconstructions had fewer complications compared with latissimus dorsi flap plus implant reconstructions (28.0% vs 30.4%, P=0.846). Also, fewer reconstructions failed in patients with abdominal-based reconstruction (2.7% vs 5.4%, P=0.650).

CONCLUSIONS:

Abdominal-based autologous reconstruction had fewer complications and fewer reconstruction failures than latissimus dorsi flap plus implant reconstructions in patients with postmastectomy radiation therapy in our series; however, these rates were not statistically significant.

PMID:
22964681
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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