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Nutr J. 2012 Sep 3;11:64. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-11-64.

Association between dietary patterns and metabolic syndrome in a sample of Portuguese adults.

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  • 1Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Rua das Taipas nº 135, Porto 4050-600, Portugal. mjoaolfonseca@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is scarce evidence regarding the association between diet and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Portuguese population. We aim to evaluate the association between a posteriori dietary patterns (DPs) and MetS and its features.

METHODS:

Using random digit dialing, a sample of 2167 adults was selected between 1999 and 2003, in Porto. During a face-to-face interview, a questionnaire was applied, anthropometric measures were taken, blood pressure measured and a fasting blood sample collected. Diet was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire, and four DPs were identified in each sex by multivariate finite mixture models.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for age and daily energy intake, comparing to the "healthy" DP, women with the "low fruit and vegetables" DP had a higher odds of high waist circumference (OR = 1.88 95% CI 1.17-3.01) and low HDL-cholesterol (OR = 1.78 95% IC 1.12-2.82) and women in the "red meat and alcohol" DP had higher odds of high waist circumference (OR = 1.45 95% CI 1.01-2.07) and of MetS (OR = 1.57 95% CI 1.07-2.29); men with the "fish" DP had a higher odds of high triglycerides (OR = 1.57 95% CI 1.05-2.35). After further adjustments (education, physical activity, smoking, alcohol drinking, BMI, and menopausal status) no significant associations remained.

CONCLUSIONS:

Four distinct DPs were identified in a community sample of Portuguese adults and there was no association with the prevalence of MetS.

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