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Pathophysiology. 2012 Sep;19(4):243-52. doi: 10.1016/j.pathophys.2012.07.001. Epub 2012 Aug 28.

On the association between glioma, wireless phones, heredity and ionising radiation.

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  • 1Department of Oncology, University Hospital, SE-701 85 Örebro, Sweden. Electronic address: michael.carlberg@orebroll.se.

Abstract

We performed two case-control studies on brain tumours diagnosed during 1 January 1997 to 30 June 2000 and 1 July 2000 to 31 December 2003, respectively. Living cases and controls aged 20-80 years were included. An additional study was performed on deceased cases with a malignant brain tumour using deceased controls. Pooled results for glioma yielded for ipsilateral use of mobile phone odds ratio (OR)=2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.8-4.7 in the >10 years latency group. The corresponding result for cordless phone was OR=3.8, 95% CI=1.8-8.1. OR increased statistically significant for cumulative use of wireless phones per 100h and per year of latency. For high-grade glioma ipsilateral use of mobile phone gave OR=3.9, 95% CI=2.3-6.6 and cordless phone OR=5.5, 95% CI=2.3-13 in the >10 years latency group. Heredity for brain tumour gave OR=3.4, 95% CI=2.1-5.5 for glioma. There was no interaction with use of wireless phones. X-ray investigation of the head gave overall OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.1-1.7 for glioma without interaction with use of wireless phones or heredity. In conclusion use of mobile and cordless phone increased the risk for glioma with highest OR for ipsilateral use, latency >10 years and third tertile of cumulative use in hours. In total, the risk was highest in the age group <20 years for first use of a wireless phone.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22939605
[PubMed]
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