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Dig Liver Dis. 2012 Dec;44(12):976-80. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2012.07.019. Epub 2012 Aug 28.

The Chicago classification for achalasia in a French multicentric cohort.

Author information

  • 1Hospices Civils de Lyon, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Digestive Physiology, Lyon F-69437, France. roman.sabine@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Achalasia is divided into 3 subtypes using the Chicago classification for high-resolution manometry. Aim of this study was to apply this classification to a multicentric French cohort of achalasia and to compare clinical and manometric characteristics between the 3 subtypes.

METHODS:

Oesophageal symptoms were collected in a retrospective study of patients diagnosed with achalasia on high-resolution manometry. Manometry data were analyzed with oesophago-gastric junction resting and relaxation pressures, and upper oesophageal sphincter resting pressure. Achalasia was classified according to the Chicago classification.

RESULTS:

From 2007 to August 2011, achalasia was diagnosed in 169 patients, 14% classified as type I, 70% as type II and 16% as type III. Type III patients were older than types I and II (62 years vs. 52, p = 0.03). Ninety five percent of patients complained of dysphagia, 16% of chest pain (no difference between the 3 subtypes); 50% of type I patients presented regurgitations compared to 33% of type II and 22% of type III (p = 0.10). Oesophago-gastric junction and upper oesophageal sphincter pressures did not differ between the 3 groups.

CONCLUSION:

Type II was the more prevalent subtype of achalasia in this French multicentre cohort. The older age of patients with type III achalasia suggests a different pathophysiology.

Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22938702
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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