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Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2012;8:473-81. doi: 10.2147/VHRM.S33305. Epub 2012 Aug 17.

Disparity in risk factor pattern in premature versus late-onset coronary artery disease: a survey of 15,381 patients.

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  • 1Department of Cardiology, Klinik am See, Rehabilitation Center of Cardiovascular Diseases, Rüdersdorf, Germany.



There are few data available regarding the specificity and modifiability of major cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in patients with premature versus (vs) late-onset coronary artery disease (CAD). This study was designed to analyze and compare these risk factors.


Data from 15,381 consecutive patients (mean age, 62.3 ± 11.7 years; female, 33.8%) hospitalized with CAD were collected from a large-scale registry (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline-Oriented Risk Factor Management) and analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups, depending on age at inclusion: group 1 patients (n = 5725; mean age, 50.5 ± 7.2 years) were males aged < 55 years and females aged < 65 years; group 2 patients (n = 9656; mean age, 69.4 ± 7.4 years) were males aged > 55 years and females aged > 65 years and had a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of >100 mg/dL on admission to cardiac rehabilitation. Besides the conventional risk factors, lipoprotein(a) concentrations and glucose tolerance were measured facultatively. Univariate (chi-square test) and multivariate logistic regression models were used.


Cigarette smoking (group 1 at 31.5% vs group 2 at 9.4%; P < 0.001), family history of CAD (group 1 at 43.6% vs group 2 at 26.5%; P < 0.001), and dyslipidemia (group 1 at 92.7% vs group 2 at 91.8%; P < 0.001) were dominant risk factors in the younger group. Arterial hypertension (group 1 at 71.4% vs group 2 at 87.0%; P < 0.001) and diabetes (group 1 at 23.5% vs group 2 at 30.1%; P < 0.001) were dominant risk factors in the older group. Impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes were less frequent in the younger group (P(trend) = 0.038), and identical lipoprotein(a) concentration levels of >30 mg/dL were found in both groups (8.0%; P = 0.810). Modification of lipid profile and blood pressure was more effective in the younger group (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol < 100 mg/dL: group 1 at 66.3% vs group 2 at 61.1%; systolic blood pressure < 140 mmHg: group 1 at 91.7% vs group 2 at 83.0%; P < 0.001).


CV risk factors differ markedly between premature and non-premature CAD. Cardiac rehabilitation provides an opportunity to reinforce secondary prevention after acute coronary syndrome.


acute coronary syndrome; cardiovascular risk factors; cholesterol; diabetes; premature manifestation

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