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Ann Behav Med. 2013 Feb;45(1):45-56. doi: 10.1007/s12160-012-9405-2.

The Alberta Diabetes and Physical Activity Trial (ADAPT): a randomized trial evaluating theory-based interventions to increase physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Author information

  • 1Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia. ron.plotnikoff@newcastle.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Physical activity (PA) is associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); however, most T2DM adults are insufficiently active.

PURPOSE:

To explore the effectiveness of two innovative/theoretically based behavioral-change strategies to increase PA and reduce hemoglobin A1c (A1c) in T2DM adults.

METHODS:

Participants (n = 287) were randomly assigned to a control group or an intervention group (i.e., print-based materials/pedometer group or print-based materials/pedometer plus telephone-counseling group). Changes in PA and A1c and other clinical measures were examined by Linear Mixed Model analyses over 18 months, along with moderating effects for gender and age.

RESULTS:

PA and A1c levels did not significantly change in intervention groups. Step counts significantly increased in the print-based materials and pedometer plus telephone counseling group, for women.

CONCLUSIONS:

No significant effects were found for PA or A1c levels for T2DM adults. The multi-component strategy including telephone counseling may have potential for women. The trial was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00221234.

PMID:
22922954
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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