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BMC Pediatr. 2012 Aug 23;12:129. doi: 10.1186/1471-2431-12-129.

Fecal calprotectin levels are higher in rural than in urban Chinese infants and negatively associated with growth.

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  • 1Department of Child and Adolescent Health Care, MOE-Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children’s Environmental Health, Xinhua Hospital, ShanghaiJiao Tong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Shanghai Institute for Pediatric Research, 1665 Kongjiang Road, Shanghai 200092, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Fecal calprotectin (FC) is an established simple biomarker of gut inflammation. To examine a possible relationship between linear growth and gut inflammation, we compared fecal calprotectin levels in 6 month old infants from poor rural vs affluent urban families.

METHODS:

The project was a cross-sectional comparison of FC from rural and urban populations in China. The relationship between length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) and FC concentrations were also compared. Single fecal samples were assayed for FC using EK-CAL ELISA kits.

RESULTS:

The age of subjects for both locations was 6.1 ± 0.2 mo; all were apparently healthy. The mean ± SD of the LAZ for the rural and urban infants were -0.6 ± 0.9 and 0.4 ± 0.9, respectively. FC had a non-normal distribution. The median FC of 420.9 and 140.1 μg/g for rural and urban infants, respectively, were significantly different (P < 0.0001). For the rural group, linear regression analysis showed that an increase in FC of 100 μg/g was associated with a decrease of 0.06 in LAZ.

CONCLUSION:

FC levels were significantly elevated in the rural infants and high concentrations accounted for approximately one-third of the low LAZ scores of these infants.

PMID:
22917269
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3504525
Free PMC Article
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