Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Lasers Surg Med. 2012 Oct;44(8):611-21. doi: 10.1002/lsm.22067. Epub 2012 Aug 21.

Spatial frequency domain imaging of port wine stain biochemical composition in response to laser therapy: a pilot study.

Author information

  • 1Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, California 92612, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Objective methods to assess port wine stain (PWS) response to laser treatment have been the subject of various research efforts for several years. Herein, we present a pilot study using a newly developed, light emitting diode (LED) based spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) device to record quantitatively biochemical compositional changes in PWS after laser therapy.

STUDY DESIGN/PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A SFDI system was used to image before, and after, five PWS treatment sessions [n = 4 subjects (one subject was imaged before and after two consecutive laser treatments)]. SFDI derived wide-field optical properties (absorption and scattering) and tissue chromophore concentrations including oxy-hemoglobin (ctO(2) Hb), deoxy-hemoglobin (ctHHb), total hemoglobin (ctTHb), and tissue oxygen saturation (stO(2) ) are presented for skin imaged prior to and immediately after laser treatment. The SFDI derived images were analyzed by comparing the above measurements in PWS to those of normal skin and tracking changes immediately after laser exposure.

RESULTS:

Elevated oxy-hemoglobin (>20%) and tissue oxygen saturation (>5%) were measured in all PWS lesions and compared to values for normal skin prior to treatment. Laser treatment resulted in an increase in deoxy-hemoglobin (>100%), decrease in tissue oxygen saturation (>10%), and reduced scattering (>15%) in all PWS lesions. One subject was followed before and after two consecutive laser treatments and the overall improvement in PWS lesion blanching was quantitatively assessed by measuring a 45% decrease in dermal blood volume.

CONCLUSION:

SFDI is a rapid non-contact wide-field optical technique that shows potential as an imaging device that can be used to quantify biochemical compositional changes in PWS after laser therapy. Future work will investigate the potential of SFDI to provide intra-operative guidance for laser therapy of PWS lesions on an individual patient basis.

Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID:
22911574
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3490707
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (7)Free text

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
Fig. 4
Fig. 5
Fig. 6
Fig. 7
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk