Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Lipid Res. 2012 Dec;53(12):2525-45. doi: 10.1194/jlr.R027904. Epub 2012 Aug 17.

Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation and cardiovascular disease.

Author information

  • 1Nutrition Program, School of Biological and Population Health Sciences, The Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA. Donald.Jump@oregonstate.edu

Abstract

Epidemiological studies on Greenland Inuits in the 1970s and subsequent human studies have established an inverse relationship between the ingestion of omega-3 fatty acids [C(20-22) ω 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)], blood levels of C(20-22) ω 3 PUFA, and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). C(20-22) ω 3 PUFA have pleiotropic effects on cell function and regulate multiple pathways controlling blood lipids, inflammatory factors, and cellular events in cardiomyocytes and vascular endothelial cells. The hypolipemic, anti-inflammatory, anti-arrhythmic properties of these fatty acids confer cardioprotection. Accordingly, national heart associations and government agencies have recommended increased consumption of fatty fish or ω 3 PUFA supplements to prevent CVD. In addition to fatty fish, sources of ω 3 PUFA are available from plants, algae, and yeast. A key question examined in this review is whether nonfish sources of ω 3 PUFA are as effective as fatty fish-derived C(20-22) ω 3 PUFA at managing risk factors linked to CVD. We focused on ω 3 PUFA metabolism and the capacity of ω 3 PUFA supplements to regulate key cellular events linked to CVD. The outcome of our analysis reveals that nonfish sources of ω 3 PUFA vary in their capacity to regulate blood levels of C(20-22) ω 3 PUFA and CVD risk factors.

PMID:
22904344
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3494243
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (4)Free text

Fig. 1.
Fig. 2.
Fig. 3.
Fig. 4.
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk