Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Antioxid Redox Signal. 2013 Feb 1;18(4):432-68. doi: 10.1089/ars.2011.4234. Epub 2012 Aug 16.

Redox control of cardiac excitability.

Author information

  • 1Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792, USA.

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation.

PMID:
22897788
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3526898
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (17)Free text

FIG. 1.
FIG. 2.
FIG. 3.
FIG. 4.
FIG. 5.
FIG. 6.
FIG. 7.
FIG. 8.
FIG. 9.
FIG. 10.
FIG. 11.
FIG. 12.
FIG. 13.
FIG. 14.
FIG. 15.
FIG. 16.
FIG. 17.
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk