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Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2012 Oct;32(10):2394-404. doi: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.112.250332. Epub 2012 Aug 2.

Diet modulates endogenous thrombin generation, a biological estimate of thrombosis risk, independently of the metabolic status.

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  • 1Inserm, UMR1062, Nutrition, Obesity, and Risk of Thrombosis, Marseille, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

High endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) is associated with venous and arterial thrombosis. Better knowledge of environmental influences on ETP may help to prevent thrombosis.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Weaning rats exhibited high ETP values that decreased in low-fat diet and remained elevated on high-fat diet. In adult rats, high-fat diet-induced ETP increase was independent of coagulation factors, obesity, and insulin resistance and negatively associated with polyunsaturated fatty acid levels. Switching from high-fat diet to low-fat diet reversed the procoagulant phenotype with a slower kinetic than the normalization of hyperinsulinemia. In humans, ETP was independent of body weight whereas it was negatively associated with nutritional markers such as the percentage of energy provided by proteins, the protein:fat ratio, circulating phenolic compounds, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid. A recommended 3-month healthy diet with reduced energy density, including lipids, decreased ETP (-21%; P<0.0001). Changes in ETP were not associated with body weight, insulin sensitivity, or coagulation factor variations, but correlated negatively with plasma docosahexaenoic acid, a nutritional status sensitive fatty acid, and compounds reflecting vegetable intake.

CONCLUSIONS:

Diet plays a pivotal role in regulating ETP, independently of obesity and insulin resistance. Global nutritional recommendations could be useful in primary prevention of venous thrombosis.

PMID:
22859493
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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