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J Med Food. 2012 Sep;15(9):802-10. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2011.0212. Epub 2012 Aug 2.

Effect of dietary blueberry pomace on selected metabolic factors associated with high fructose feeding in growing Sprague-Dawley rats.

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  • 1Department of Food Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72704, USA.

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to study the protective effect of feeding extruded and unextruded blueberry pomace (BBP) on selected metabolic parameters associated with metabolic syndrome in a model of high fructose (HF)-fed growing Sprague-Dawley rats. Treatments were as follows: (1) control (modified AIN-based diet); (2) HF diet (AIN diet with 58% fructose); (3) HF diet with 1.5% unextruded BBP; (4) HF diet with 1.5% extruded BBP; (5) HF diet with 3% unextruded BBP; and (6) HF diet with 3% extruded BBP. Compared with the control, HF feeding increased fasting plasma insulin and fasting and postprandial plasma triglycerides as well as homeostatic scores of insulin resistance and β-cell function, but not weight gain, diet intake and efficiency, abdominal fat, oral glucose tolerance, and fasting and postprandial plasma glucose, cholesterol, and leptin levels. Inclusion of unextruded or extruded BBP was effective in minimizing or ameliorating the fructose-induced metabolic anomalies, except postprandial plasma triglycerides, especially at 3% of the diet. In addition, unextruded or extruded BBP at 3% of the diet was also able to reduce plasma cholesterol and abdominal fat relative to the HF control, which may impart additional health benefits. Compared with the control, inclusion of unextruded or extruded BBP at both 1.5% and 3% resulted in lower total fat weight, and animals fed a diet supplemented with 3% unextruded BBP in fasting state or 3% unextruded BBP in fed state had lower leptin levels than the control. This is the first study demonstrating the beneficial effects of feeding blueberry pomace on health.

PMID:
22856519
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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