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Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2012;2012:628352. doi: 10.1155/2012/628352. Epub 2012 Jul 10.

Low-frequency fatigue as an indicator of eccentric exercise-induced muscle injury: the role of vitamin E.

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  • 1Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry Laboratory, Department of Physical Education and Sports Science at Serres, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 62110 Serres, Greece. akyparos@phed-sr.auth.gr

Abstract

This study investigates whether vitamin E can attenuate eccentric exercise-induced soleus muscle injury as indicated by the amelioration of in situ isometric force decline following a low-frequency fatigue protocol (stimulation at 4 Hz for 5 min) and the ability of the muscle to recover 3 min after the termination of the fatigue protocol. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into vitamin E-supplemented or placebo-supplemented groups studied at rest, immediately post-exercise or 48 h post-exercise. Daily dl-α-tocopheryl acetate intraperitoneal injections of 100 mg/kg body mass for 5 consecutive days prior to exercise doubled its plasma levels. Fatigue index and recovery index expressed as a percentage of the initial tension. FI at 0 h post- and 48 h post-exercise respectively was 88% ± 4.2% and 89% ± 6.8% in the vitamin E groups versus 76% ± 3% and 80% ± 11% in the placebo groups. RI was 99% ± 3.4% and 100% ± 6% in the vitamin E groups versus 82% ± 3.1% and 84% ± 5.9% in the placebo groups. Complementally to the traditionally recorded maximal force, low-frequency fatigue measures may be beneficial for assessing injury-induced decrease in muscle functionality.

PMID:
22848781
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3400461
Free PMC Article

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