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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Aug 7;109(32):12938-43. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1204928109. Epub 2012 Jul 25.

Nucleic acid scavengers inhibit thrombosis without increasing bleeding.

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  • 1Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

Abstract

Development of effective, yet safe, antithrombotic agents has been challenging because such agents increase the propensity of patients to bleed. Recently, naturally occurring polyphosphates such as extracellular DNA, RNA, and inorganic polyphosphates have been shown to activate blood coagulation. In this report, we evaluate the anticoagulant and antithrombotic activity of nucleic acid-binding polymers in vitro and in vivo. Such polymers bind to DNA, RNA, and inorganic polyphosphate molecules with high affinity and inhibit RNA- and polyphosphate-induced clotting and the activation of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation in vitro. Moreover, [NH(2)(CH(2))(2)NH(2)](G = 3);dendri PAMAM(NH(2))(32) (PAMAM G-3) prevents thrombosis following carotid artery injury and pulmonary thromboembolism in mice without significantly increasing blood loss from surgically challenged animals. These studies indicate that nucleic acid-binding polymers are able to scavenge effectively prothrombotic nucleic acids and other polyphosphates in vivo and represent a new and potentially safer class of antithrombotic agents.

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