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Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2012 Aug;66(5):418-22. doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1819.2012.02378.x.

Clinical evaluation of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube feeding in Japanese patients with dementia.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo Tokyo Koto Geriatric Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan. kumagai@juntendo-urayasu.jp

Abstract

AIM:

The aim of this study was to clinically evaluate percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube feeding of elderly Japanese patients with dementia.

METHOD:

The records of the 155 patients with dementia who underwent PEG in Juntendo Tokyo Koto Geriatric Medical Center were reviewed for pertinent clinical data, including diagnosis of dementia, place of stay before and after hospitalization, as well as survival rate, albumin levels, and incidence of aspiration pneumonia (AP) before and 6 months after PEG feeding. The latter three data of these patients were compared with those of 106 patients with dementia fed through a nasogastric (NG) tube.

RESULTS:

Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia were predominant. Fifty-three percent of the patients were admitted from their home; the number of discharges to homes decreased to 21.2%. The mean (SD) of the albumin levels was 2.9 (0.4) g/dl before feeding and 2.9 (0.6) g/dl after 6 months. Among the patients with AP before PEG tube feeding, 51.6% had an AP recurrence. Conversely, AP occurred in 9.4% of the patients without AP before feeding. The patient survival rate was higher by 27 months when using PEG tube than when using an NG tube.

CONCLUSION:

PEG tube feeding in patients with dementia leads to preservation of status for a few years. Compared with NG tube feeding, PEG tube feeding did not induce AP due to impairment of intact swallowing function, and was associated with higher survival rate of approximately 2 years. However, PEG tube feeding does not seem to promote home medical care.

© 2012 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2012 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

PMID:
22834660
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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