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Transl Psychiatry. 2011 Oct 18;1:e49. doi: 10.1038/tp.2011.42.

Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common variants in CTNNA2 associated with excitement-seeking.

Author information

  • 1National Institute on Aging, NIH, DHHS, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA. Terraccianoa@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

The tendency to seek stimulating activities and intense sensations define excitement-seeking, a personality trait akin to some aspects of sensation-seeking. This trait is a central feature of extraversion and is a component of the multifaceted impulsivity construct. Those who score high on measures of excitement-seeking are more likely to smoke, use other drugs, gamble, drive recklessly, have unsafe/unprotected sex and engage in other risky behaviors of clinical and social relevance. To identify common genetic variants associated with the Excitement-Seeking scale of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, we performed genome-wide association studies in six samples of European ancestry (N=7860), and combined the results in a meta-analysis. We identified a genome-wide significant association between the Excitement-Seeking scale and rs7600563 (P=2 × 10(-8)). This single-nucleotide polymorphism maps within the catenin cadherin-associated protein, alpha 2 (CTNNA2) gene, which encodes for a brain-expressed α-catenin critical for synaptic contact. The effect of rs7600563 was in the same direction in all six samples, but did not replicate in additional samples (N=5105). The results provide insight into the genetics of excitement-seeking and risk-taking, and are relevant to hyperactivity, substance use, antisocial and bipolar disorders.

PMID:
22833195
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3309493
Free PMC Article

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