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Accid Anal Prev. 2013 Jan;50:600-7. doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2012.06.008. Epub 2012 Jul 24.

Using naturalistic driving data to identify variables associated with infrequent, occasional, and consistent seat belt use.

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  • 1National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, United States. Ian.Reagan@dot.gov

Abstract

Seat belt use is one of the most effective countermeasures to reduce traffic fatalities and injuries. The success of efforts to increase use is measured by road side observations and self-report questionnaires. These methods have shortcomings, with the former requiring a binary point estimate and the latter being subjective. The 100-car naturalistic driving study presented a unique opportunity to study seat belt use in that seat belt status was known for every trip each driver made during a 12-month period. Drivers were grouped into infrequent, occasional, or consistent seat belt users based on the frequency of belt use. Analyses were then completed to assess if these groups differed on several measures including personality, demographics, self-reported driving style variables as well as measures from the 100-car study instrumentation suite (average trip speed, trips per day). In addition, detailed analyses of the occasional belt user group were completed to identify factors that were predictive of occasional belt users wearing their belts. The analyses indicated that consistent seat belt users took fewer trips per day, and that increased average trip speed was associated with increased belt use among occasional belt users. The results of this project may help focus messaging efforts to convert occasional and inconsistent seat belt users to consistent users.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22831496
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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