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Prostate. 2013 Feb 15;73(3):250-60. doi: 10.1002/pros.22564. Epub 2012 Jul 20.

Use of β-blockers is associated with prostate cancer-specific survival in prostate cancer patients on androgen deprivation therapy.

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  • 1Department of Tumor Biology, Institute of Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospitalet, Oslo, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Experimental evidence suggests a role for the β(2) -adrenergic receptor pathway in prostate cancer (PCa). We have investigated the association of β-blocker use with PCa incidence and survival in a Norwegian cohort.

METHODS:

Data from the Oslo II study in 2000 (n = 6515) were linked with information from the Cancer Registry of Norway and Statistics Norway. PCa risk and overall- and PCa-specific mortality were analyzed using uni- and multi-variable Cox- and competing risk regression models.

RESULTS:

At baseline, 776 men (11.9%) reported using a β-blocker. 212 men (3.3%) were diagnosed with PCa before the survey, leaving 6,303 eligible for incidence analysis. During a median follow-up of 122 months, 448 (7.1%) men were diagnosed with PCa. β-blocker use was not associated with PCa risk [hazard ratio (HR): 1.05, 95% CI: 0.79-1.40]. For all patients (n = 655; including med diagnosed before the survey), β-blocker use was not associated with PCa-specific mortality (HR: 0.55, 95% CI 0.24-1.26, P = 0.16). However, in the subgroup of men planned to receive androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), as reported to the Cancer Registry (n = 263), β-blocker use was associated with reduced PCa-specific mortality (HR: 0.14, 95% CI 0.02-0.85, P = 0.032). No effect on overall mortality was seen (HR, all patients: 0.88, 95% CI 0.56-1.38, P = 0.57). β-blocker use did not appear to affect PSA level, Gleason score, or T-stage at diagnosis; however, these variables were missing for many cases.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings demonstrate a possible benefit of β-blocker use for men treated with ADT, suggesting the need for investigation in larger cohorts.

Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID:
22821802
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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