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Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2012 Sep;87(3):385-93. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.2012.11-0633. Epub 2012 Jul 16.

Impact of a school-based hygiene promotion and sanitation intervention on pupil hand contamination in Western Kenya: a cluster randomized trial.

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  • 1Center for Global Safe Water, Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. lgreen4@emory.edu

Abstract

Handwashing with soap effectively reduces exposure to diarrhea-causing pathogens. Interventions to improve hygiene and sanitation conditions in schools within low-income countries have gained increased attention; however, their impact on schoolchildren's exposure to fecal pathogens has not been established. Our trial examined whether a school-based water, sanitation, and hygiene intervention reduced Escherichia coli contamination on pupils' hands in western Kenya. A hygiene promotion and water treatment intervention did not reduce risk of E. coli presence (relative risk [RR] = 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.54-1.56); the addition of new latrines to intervention schools significantly increased risk among girls (RR = 2.63, 95% CI = 1.29-5.34), with a non-significant increase among boys (RR = 1.36, 95% CI = 0.74-2.49). Efforts to increase usage of school latrines by constructing new facilities may pose a risk to children in the absence of sufficient hygiene behavior change, daily provision of soap and water, and anal cleansing materials.

PMID:
22802437
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3435337
Free PMC Article
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