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Compr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;53(8):1153-60. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2012.05.006. Epub 2012 Jul 15.

Clinically significant hoarding in obsessive-compulsive disorder: results from an Indian study.

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  • 1National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore, India.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hoarding is frequently conceptualized as a symptom of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but recent evidence indicates that, in most cases, hoarding may be better conceptualized as a distinct disorder that can coexist with OCD. Most of the research on hoarding is from the Western countries. This study aimed to provide data on the prevalence and correlates of clinically significant hoarding in a large sample of patients with OCD from the Indian subcontinent.

METHODS:

We examined 200 patients with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition OCD for clinically significant hoarding using the Saving Inventory-Revised, followed by a clinical interview.

RESULTS:

Twenty patients (10%) had clinically significant hoarding. In all cases, hoarding did not appear to be related or secondary to other OCD symptoms. None of the cases consulted for their hoarding problems. Compared with nonhoarders, hoarders hailed exclusively from an urban background and had a significantly higher frequency of certain obsessions and compulsions, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, cluster C personality disorders, and a higher number of lifetime suicidal attempts. They also had a more severe OCD along with poorer global functioning and somewhat poorer insight into obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results suggest that clinically significant hoarding is relatively prevalent in Indian patients with OCD and that it appears to be largely unrelated to the OCD phenotype. However, the presence of comorbid hoarding is associated with more severe OCD, high comorbidity, more suicidal attempts, and a lower level of functioning. The results contribute to the current nosologic debate around hoarding disorder and provide a unique transcultural perspective.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22796017
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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