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J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012 Sep;112(9):1428-35. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2012.05.014. Epub 2012 Jul 13.

Self-monitoring and eating-related behaviors are associated with 12-month weight loss in postmenopausal overweight-to-obese women.

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  • 1Cancer Education and Career Development Program, Institute for Health Research and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.


Lifestyle-based interventions, which typically promote various behavior modification strategies, can serve as a setting for evaluating specific behaviors and strategies thought to promote or hinder weight loss. The aim of our study was to test the associations of self-monitoring (ie, self-weighing and food journal completion) and eating-related (ie, dietary intake, diet-related weight-control strategies, and meal patterns) behaviors with weight loss in a sample of postmenopausal overweight-to-obese women enrolled in a 12-month dietary weight loss intervention. Changes in body weight and adoption of self-monitoring and eating-related behaviors were assessed in 123 participants. Generalized linear models tested associations of these behaviors with 12-month weight change after adjusting for potential confounders. Mean percent weight loss was 10.7%. In the final model, completing more food journals was associated with a greater percent weight loss (interquartile range 3.7% greater weight loss; P<0.0001), whereas skipping meals (4.3% lower weight loss; P<0.05) and eating out for lunch (at least once a week, 2.5% lower weight loss; P<0.01) were associated with a lower amount of weight loss. These findings suggest that a greater focus on dietary self-monitoring, home-prepared meals, and consuming meals at regular intervals may improve 12-month weight loss among postmenopausal women enrolled in a dietary weight loss intervention.

Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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