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Magn Reson Med Sci. 2012;11(2):117-27.

Ovarian masses: MR imaging with T1-weighted 3-dimensional gradient-echo IDEAL water-fat separation sequence at 3T.

Author information

  • 1Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan. mhori@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We retrospectively compared the efficacy of 3-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo magnetic resonance T(1)-weighted sequence using the iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL) technique with the efficacy of conventional 3D gradient-echo sequences for diagnosing ovarian masses at 3T.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In images of 32 women (mean age, 45.3 years) with ovarian masses who underwent T(1)-weighted imaging with both IDEAL and conventional techniques, we quantitatively analyzed signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast between gluteal muscle and T(1)-weighted high-signal materials within lesions and assessed image quality. Two radiologists independently evaluated fat detection.

RESULTS:

Mean SNR of subcutaneous fat did not differ significantly between IDEAL and conventional techniques for both fat-suppressed (P=.32) and non-fat-suppressed (P=.85) images. Mean absolute contrast between gluteal muscle and T(1)-weighted high signal materials within teratomas (n=15) was significantly higher with IDEAL on fat-suppressed images (P=.002) and lower with IDEAL on non-fat-suppressed images (P=.010). Fat suppression was significantly superior with IDEAL (P<.0001). Readers' assessments of fat detection did not differ between IDEAL and conventional sequences.

CONCLUSION:

The quality of T(1)-weighted fat-suppressed images of ovarian masses was better with 3D gradient-echo IDEAL than conventional 3D gradient-echo sequences.

PMID:
22790298
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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