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Small GTPases. 2012 Apr-Jun;3(2):91-6. doi: 10.4161/sgtp.19112.

The circumferential actomyosin belt in epithelial cells is regulated by the Lulu2-p114RhoGEF system.

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  • 1Global COE Program for Integrative Membrane Biology, Graduate School of Medicine; Kobe University, Chuo-ku, Kobe Japan.

Abstract

In epithelial cells, myosin-II-dependent forces regulate many aspects of animal morphogenesis, such as apical constriction, cell intercalation, cell sorting, and the formation and maintenance of the adherens junction. These forces are mainly generated by the circumferential actomyosin belt, which is composed of F-actin-myosin II bundles located along apical cell-cell junctions. Although several of the molecular pathways regulating the belt have been identified, the precise mechanisms underlying its function are largely unknown. Our recent studies identified Lulu proteins (Lulu1 and Lulu2), FERM-domain-containing molecules, as the regulators of the belt. Lulus activate the circumferential actomyosin belt and thereby induce apical constriction in epithelial cells; conversely, RNAi-mediated Lulu-knockdown results in the severe disorganization of the circumferential actomyosin belt. We also showed that p114RhoGEF is a downstream molecule of Lulu2 in its regulation of the belt; Lulu2 enhances the catalytic activity of p114RhoGEF through a direct interaction and thereby activates the circumferential actomyosin belt. We further identified aPKC and Patj as regulators of Lulu2-p114RhoGEF. In this commentary, we discuss current knowledge of the circumferential actomyosin belt's regulation, focusing on the Lulu2-p114RhoGEF system.

PMID:
22790195
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3408982
Free PMC Article

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