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Ann Behav Med. 2012 Oct;44(2):248-58. doi: 10.1007/s12160-012-9383-4.

The built environment moderates effects of family-based childhood obesity treatment over 2 years.

Author information

  • 1University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, NY, USA. lhenet@buffalo.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Research suggests the neighborhood built environment is related to child physical activity and eating.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to determine if characteristics of the neighborhood environment moderate the relationship between obesity treatment and weight loss, and if outcomes of particular treatments are moderated by built environment characteristics.

METHOD:

The relationship between the built environment and standardized BMI (zBMI) changes for 191 8-12-year-old children who participated in one of four randomized, controlled trials of pediatric weight management was assessed using mixed models analysis of covariance.

RESULTS:

At 2-year follow-up, greater parkland, fewer convenience stores, and fewer supermarkets were associated with greater zBMI reduction across all interventions. No treatments interacted with characteristics of the built environment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Activity- and eating-related built neighborhood characteristics are associated with child success in behavioral obesity treatments. Efficacy may be improved by individualizing treatments based on built environment characteristics.

PMID:
22777879
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3446779
Free PMC Article
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