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Ethn Dis. 2012 Winter;22(1):38-44.

Type 2 diabetes and ethnic disparities in cognitive impairment.

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  • 1Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We explored whether ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes (T2D) explain ethnic disparities in cognitive impairment.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal study.

SETTING:

A cohort study of multiethnic community-dwelling elderly persons in Northern Manhattan, New York.

PARTICIPANTS:

941 participants aged > or =65 years without prevalent cognitive impairment or dementia (CID) were followed for a median of 7.1 years.

MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES:

CID was defined by a clinical dementia rating > or = .5. CID risk attributable to T2D was estimated for each ethnic group using the hazard ratio (HR) relating T2D and CID and the ethnic prevalence of T2D.

RESULTS:

448 participants developed CID; 69 (31.4%) non-Hispanic whites (whites); 152 (48.6%) non-Hispanic-blacks (blacks); 227 (55.6%) Hispanics, P < .001. T2D prevalence was 8.2% in Whites, 20.1% in blacks, and 19.6% in Hispanics, P < .001. Controlling for age, sex, education, and APOE E4, the HR relating T2D and CID was 1.63 (95% CI 1.26, 2.09). CID attributable to T2D was higher in blacks and Hispanics compared to Whites (11.4% vs. 4.9%; P = .06). We estimated that reducing the ethnic disparities in diabetes prevalence could reduce the CID ethnic disparities by 17%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Reducing ethnic differences in T2D prevalence could partially reduce ethnic differences in incident CID.

PMID:
22774307
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3398739
Free PMC Article
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