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Urology. 2012 Sep;80(3):656-60. doi: 10.1016/j.urology.2012.04.051. Epub 2012 Jul 7.

Pathologic findings in radical prostatectomy specimens from patients eligible for active surveillance with highly selective criteria: a multicenter study.

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  • 1Urology Department, Rangueil University Hospital, Toulouse, France.



To evaluate the pathologic features of surgical specimens after radical prostatectomy in patients with low-risk prostate cancer fulfilling the strictest pathologic selection criteria for active surveillance.


Retrospective analysis of 10 785 consecutive radical prostatectomy performed in 10 university hospitals (January 2003 through December 2008). A total of 919 patients fulfilled the following unique and very stringent criteria: T1c, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <10 ng/mL, a single positive biopsy, tumor length <3 mm, and Gleason score <7. Clinico-biologic and pathologic data at diagnosis and after radical prostatectomy, prostatic and tumor volume, pathologic Gleason score and stage, positive surgical margins, insignificant prostate cancer, and PSA outcomes were recorded.


Median age was 63 years. Mean prebiopsy PSA level was 6.2 ng/mL. At radical prostatectomy, Gleason score was upgraded in 34% of patients, including 1.2% Gleason score 8-9. Pathologic stages were pT2 in 87.3%, pT3 in 11.1%, and pT4 in 1.4% of cases. Extraprostatic extension was found in 12.5%. Only 26% of patients had "insignificant" tumors. Biochemical recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 92.3%. There was no significant difference in survival between patients with "significant" and "insignificant" tumors (90.1% vs 93.4%; P = .06).


Despite of a stringent selection of patients with low-risk prostate cancer, active surveillance definition included a significant proportion of patients with upstaged (about 12%) and upgraded (about one-third) disease at diagnosis. Only a quarter of active surveillance patients have a pathologically confirmed "insignificant" cancer.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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