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J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 2012 Oct;38(5):1125-31. Epub 2012 Jun 25.

An archer's perceived form scales the "hitableness" of archery targets.

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  • 1Department of Psychology, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju-si, Gyeongsangnam-do, Korea. yangleepsy@yahoo.co.kr

Abstract

For skills that involve hitting a target, subsequent judgments of target size correlate with prior success in hitting that target. We used an archery context to examine the judgment-success relationship with varied target sizes in the absence of explicit knowledge of results. Competitive archers shot at targets 50 m away that varied in size among five diameters. Immediately after the arrow's release, its flight and landing were occluded and archers chose which of 18 miniature targets looked most like the distal target. Greater apparent size correlated with higher accuracy. In a second experiment, nonarchers merely aimed the bow (without an arrow) at varied targets. Apparent size was larger when the bow arm was stabilized than when it was not. Archery is seemingly an instance of affordance-based control: For an archer, the affordance of the target is the "hitableness" of its central regions, a property inclusive of his or her momentary, and perceptible, archery form.

PMID:
22731994
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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