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PLoS One. 2012;7(6):e39048. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0039048. Epub 2012 Jun 18.

Divergent effects of beliefs in heaven and hell on national crime rates.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA. shariff@uoregon.edu

Abstract

Though religion has been shown to have generally positive effects on normative 'prosocial' behavior, recent laboratory research suggests that these effects may be driven primarily by supernatural punishment. Supernatural benevolence, on the other hand, may actually be associated with less prosocial behavior. Here, we investigate these effects at the societal level, showing that the proportion of people who believe in hell negatively predicts national crime rates whereas belief in heaven predicts higher crime rates. These effects remain after accounting for a host of covariates, and ultimately prove stronger predictors of national crime rates than economic variables such as GDP and income inequality. Expanding on laboratory research on religious prosociality, this is the first study to tie religious beliefs to large-scale cross-national trends in pro- and anti-social behavior.

PMID:
22723927
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3377603
Free PMC Article

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