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Front Neurol. 2012 Jun 20;3:98. doi: 10.3389/fneur.2012.00098. eCollection 2012.

Evaluating Medical Student Communication/Professionalism Skills from a Patient's Perspective.

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  • 1Neurology Service, New Mexico Veterans Affairs Health Care System Albuquerque, NM, USA.

Abstract

Objective: Evaluate medical students' communication and professionalism skills from the perspective of the ambulatory patient and later compare these skills in their first year of residency. Methods: Students in third year neurology clerkship clinics see patients alone followed by a revisit with an attending neurologist. The patient is then asked to complete a voluntary, anonymous, Likert scale questionnaire rating the student on friendliness, listening to the patient, respecting the patient, using understandable language, and grooming. For students who had completed 1 year of residency these professionalism ratings were compared with those from their residency director. Results: Seven hundred forty-two questionnaires for 165 clerkship students from 2007 to 2009 were analyzed. Eighty-three percent of forms were returned with an average of 5 per student. In 64% of questionnaires, patients rated students very good in all five categories; in 35% patients selected either very good or good ratings; and <1% rated any student fair. No students were rated poor or very poor. Sixty-two percent of patients wrote complimentary comments about the students. From the Class of 2008, 52% of students received "better than their peers" professionalism ratings from their PGY1 residency directors and only one student was rated "below their peers." Conclusion: This questionnaire allowed patient perceptions of their students' communication/professionalism skills to be evaluated in a systematic manner. Residency director ratings of professionalism of the same students at the end of their first year of residency confirms continued professional behavior.

KEYWORDS:

medical education; medical ethics; professional conduct

PMID:
22723790
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3379033
Free PMC Article
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