Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Infant Behav Dev. 2012 Jun;35(3):489-98. doi: 10.1016/j.infbeh.2012.04.005. Epub 2012 Jun 19.

Parent-child interaction, maternal depressive symptoms and preterm infant cognitive function.

Author information

  • 1Department of Health Systems, Management and Policy, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO, United States. beth mcmanus@post.harvard.edu

Abstract

Preterm infants are at risk for cognitive difficulties due to infant neurological immaturity and family social disadvantage, and this may be exacerbated by maternal depressive symptoms. This longitudinal study of infants born preterm (<35 weeks) or low birth weight (<2500 g) (n = 137) tests if maternal depressive symptoms at 4 months is associated with preterm children's cognitive function at 16 months. Additionally, we test if this association is mediated by the quality of parent-child interaction at 9 months, and if these associations differ by levels of maternal social support. Children's cognitive function was measured using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 2nd edition. Maternal depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Perceived social support was measured using the Maternal Support scale. The quality of parent-child interaction was measured using the Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment. Linear regression and structural equation modeling were used to test the research questions. Postnatal depression at 4 months is associated with lower cognitive function (mean difference = -5.22, 95% CI: [-10.19, -0.25]) at 16 months controlling for a host of socioeconomic characteristics. For mothers with fewer depressive symptoms, bolstering effects of maternal supports on children's cognitive function were evident. We find no evidence for effect mediation by quality of parent-child interaction. Early exposure to maternal depressive symptoms appears to have a negative influence on preterm children's later cognitive function. These findings suggest important policy and programmatic implications for early detection and intervention for families of preterm infants.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22721747
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3409313
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (2)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk