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Health Serv Res. 2013 Feb;48(1):150-74. doi: 10.1111/j.1475-6773.2012.01435.x. Epub 2012 Jun 20.

Comparative effectiveness of standard versus patient-centered collaborative care interventions for depression among African Americans in primary care settings: the BRIDGE Study.

Author information

  • 1Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. lisa.cooper@jhmi.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the effectiveness of standard and patient-centered, culturally tailored collaborative care (CC) interventions for African American patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) over 12 months of follow-up.

DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING:

Twenty-seven primary care clinicians and 132 African American patients with MDD in urban community-based practices in Maryland and Delaware.

STUDY DESIGN:

Cluster randomized trial with patient-level, intent-to-treat analyses.

DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS:

Patients completed screener and baseline, 6-, 12-, and 18-month interviews to assess depression severity, mental health functioning, health service utilization, and patient ratings of care.

PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Patients in both interventions showed statistically significant improvements over 12 months. Compared with standard, patient-centered CC patients had similar reductions in depression symptom levels (-2.41 points; 95 percent confidence interval (CI), -7.7, 2.9), improvement in mental health functioning scores (+3.0 points; 95 percent CI, -2.2, 8.3), and odds of rating their clinician as participatory (OR, 1.48, 95 percent CI, 0.53, 4.17). Treatment rates increased among standard (OR = 1.8, 95 percent CI 1.0, 3.2), but not patient-centered (OR = 1.0, 95 percent CI 0.6, 1.8) CC patients. However, patient-centered CC patients rated their care manager as more helpful at identifying their concerns (OR, 3.00; 95 percent CI, 1.23, 7.30) and helping them adhere to treatment (OR, 2.60; 95 percent CI, 1.11, 6.08).

CONCLUSIONS:

Patient-centered and standard CC approaches to depression care showed similar improvements in clinical outcomes for African Americans with depression; standard CC resulted in higher rates of treatment, and patient-centered CC resulted in better ratings of care.

© Health Research and Educational Trust.

PMID:
22716199
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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