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J Pediatr Surg. 2012 Jun;47(6):1105-10. doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2012.03.016.

Effect of time to surgical evaluation on the outcomes of infants with gastroschisis.

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  • 1Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, St Louis Children's Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. bucherb@wudosis.wustl.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Our goal is to identify the impact of time to surgical intervention on the outcomes of infants with gastroschisis.

METHODS:

After institutional review board approval, we performed a retrospective review of the medical records of all infants admitted to our institution from 2001 to 2010. Transport, bowel stabilization, and closure times were defined as the time from birth to admission, admission to the first-documented operative intervention, and first operative intervention to abdominal closure, respectively. Outcomes included age at full enteral feeds, total parental nutrition days, ventilator days, and hospital length of stay. Multivariate analysis was used to identify independent predictors of the outcomes.

RESULTS:

One hundred eighteen infants with gastroschisis were included in our study. Transport and bowel stabilization times were not predictive of any outcome. However, the time to abdominal wall closure and postnatal gastrointestinal complications were independently predictive of age at full enteral feeds, total parenteral nutrition days, and hospital length of stay.

CONCLUSION:

Time to surgical evaluation/bowel stabilization was not predictive of any clinically relevant outcomes in infants with gastroschisis. These data demonstrate that potential benefits from prenatal regionalization of infants with gastroschisis are not supported by decreased time to operative intervention.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22703778
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3658821
Free PMC Article
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