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Ann Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;22(8):592-7. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2012.05.002. Epub 2012 Jun 12.

Serum organochlorine pesticide residues and risk of gallstone disease: a case-control study in Xiamen.

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  • 1School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Fujian, China.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate the association between serum organochlorine pesticide residues and risk of gallstone disease.

METHODS:

A 1:1, pair-matched, case-control study was designed. Data from 150 patients with gallstones diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography at a single hospital from June 2009 to June 2010 were collected. A total of 150 patients without gallstones during the same period at the same hospital were recruited as the control group. Capillary gas chromatography was employed to measure the serum concentrations of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) residues. Multiple-factor conditional logistic regression analysis was conducted to estimate the relative risk of gallstones in relation to organochlorine pesticide residues in serum.

RESULTS:

The percentages of p,p'-DDD and o,p'-DDT in serum of patients were significantly higher than those in serum of controls. The p,p'-DDE, α-HCH, and δ-HCH residues in serum of patients were also significantly increased compared with those in serum of controls. Multiple-factor conditional logistic regression analysis showed that high levels of p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDT residues were risk factors for gallstone disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

A high level of organochlorine pesticide residues in serum is a potential risk factor for gallstone disease, which suggests that environmental exposure to organochlorine pesticides should be evaluated with respect to gallstone formation.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22695391
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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